Saving some of your earnings by living below your means is a key to successful investing. There are many ways to find money to invest, such as living simply so you’ll save more money and developing a career so you’ll make more money. The Earning and Saving category equips you with practical tips for spending less and earning more.

My Financial Goals for 2017

As 2016 comes to a close, I’ve been thinking more and more about what I want to accomplish in 2017. This contemplation has involved considering my strengths and figuring out how to address my weaknesses.

What I’ve discovered is that while I’m great a few things (which has helped me tremendously), I need to broaden and update my talents. I often feel like Joel McHale’s character in The Great Indoors: I have experience and knowledge that could be helpful and inspiring to others but I’m not as adept at reaching people.

Still, I don’t want to abandon what I know. Instead, I hope to build upon my background. So, my goals include continuing to improve on my strengths, addressing areas of weakness, and expanding my knowledge.

Here are my goals:

Why 401(k) Default Options May Not Be Enough

I’ve been reading Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics by Richard H. Thaler. A point of interest is the discussion of automatic enrollment in 401k plans. Automatic enrollment may get employees started saving for retirement. But 401k default options associated with this type of sign-up (such as an investment choice of a money market fund and a savings rate of 3%) may be unlikely to help employees achieve the outcomes needed for a comfortable retirement.

According to Thaler, “Both of these default choices — the money market investment option and the 3% savings rate — were not intended by the employer to be either suggestions or advice. Instead, these options were picked to minimize the chance that the company would be sued.”

So, what’s the story about these default options?

Choosing and Navigating Public Schools (So You Can Save Money)

Educating children can be challenging no matter where they go to school or how they learn. School quality can vary. And my experiences may be much different than yours — both as a parent and as a student back in the ’60s and ’70s during the somewhat chaotic years of desegregation . Whatever your circumstances, hopefully these thoughts can give you insights into choosing and navigating your children’s school situation:

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