5 Ways to Fund My Bucket List

I’ve mentioned before that I haven’t been all that great at setting life goals and financial goals to match them when I was younger. But now that I’m older, I’ve started to develop a bucket list.

After making my bucket list, I’ve started tackling goals. No matter the urgency, I’ve considered fulfilling at least one item each year in order to make my list a pleasure to complete, not a chore.

Some items may not require a lot of cash. Running a marathon, for example, will involve lots of time but minimal expenses — especially if I choose a race within driving distance. But others, like visiting the Arctic, will cost a lot more. Still, I figure if I start planning now, I’ll be much more likely to achieve my dreams.

For those generally pricier items, here are five ways to consider funding a bucket list:

5 Ways to Identify Your Bucket List Items

When contemplating saving and investing money (rather than spending immediately), typically, I’ll consider a specific purpose and timeline. If unsure exactly what my future life will look like, I can use these financial goals as a basic guide.

While doing the sometimes dull work of financial goal setting, I might also create a bucket list, a process that is generally more fun. I haven’t always kept such a list. But now that I have the time, money, and desire to pursue bigger projects and trips, here are ways I’ve learned to identify items for my bucket list:

6 Practical Ways to Keep Your Emotions in Check When Investing

According to The Motley Fool, financial data firm Dalbar has found that “Investors tend to sell after experiencing a paper loss and start investing only after the markets have recovered their value. The devastating result of this behavior is participation in the downside while being out of the market during the rise.”

In the past, particularly as a younger investor, I noticed that I may feel inspired to invest in fast-growing, popular businesses when shares are in high demand; at other times, I may feel compelled to get rid of faltering, downward-trending companies with depressed stock prices. And, even though my feelings didn’t typically drive me to act on these feelings, I often felt anxious during times of market turbulence.

Over the years, I have become more adept at making intentional investment decisions, driven by long-term goals not short-term angst or excitement. Plus, I have learned not to let day-to-day market moves dictate my mood. Here are practical ways I have learned to keep emotions in check when investing:

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