6 Practical Ways to Keep Your Emotions in Check When Investing

According to The Motley Fool, financial data firm Dalbar has found that “Investors tend to sell after experiencing a paper loss and start investing only after the markets have recovered their value. The devastating result of this behavior is participation in the downside while being out of the market during the rise.”

In the past, particularly as a younger investor, I noticed that I may feel inspired to invest in fast-growing, popular businesses when shares are in high demand; at other times, I may feel compelled to get rid of faltering, downward-trending companies with depressed stock prices. And, even though my feelings didn’t typically drive me to act on these feelings, I often felt anxious during times of market turbulence.

Over the years, I have become more adept at making intentional investment decisions, driven by long-term goals not short-term angst or excitement. Plus, I have learned not to let day-to-day market moves dictate my mood. Here are practical ways I have learned to keep emotions in check when investing:

Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Review: Asset Allocation with a Modern Twist

For many years, Schwab has offered wealth management services, including managed portfolios and custom advice. However, the more traditional model of delivering these services at the entry level has involved packaging a diversified portfolio of mutual funds and ETFs with a minimum investment of $25,000 and asset management fee of .90%.

The automated “intelligent portfolios” allow smaller investors to gain access to advisory services with no direct charges to their accounts. Learn more about these portfolios.

What is Asset Allocation?

When I’ve read about investing and considered the services of investment advisory firms, I’ve often encountered the term of asset allocation.

What is asset allocation? A simple definition: it’s putting my proverbial eggs in multiple, uncorrelated baskets. For an investor, this process involves allocating investments among the big three types of asset classes: equities, fixed income instruments, and cash and its equivalents.