Different Talents, Different Ways of Building Wealth

This summer, a female friend and I got together to ride bikes — something that we did together often, though generally with more people from our circles of our cycling companions. But this time, on a ride that started on a weekday morning and ended in the early afternoon, some of our buddies teased us about having to work and being unable to join us.

At one of our rest stops, we talked about the fact that we generated income through investing-type activities.

This experience made me wonder if too few people are investing for the long term and relying on current income to pay bills and make large purchases, whether for a new cycling gadget, an epic trip, or retirement years. I grasp that working in a traditional job doesn’t negate saving and investing for the long haul. But the inability to realize that others may have sources of income outside of a regular job cues me to consider that not everyone exercises their talents, interests, and inclinations in a way that’s conducive to accumulating and building wealth.

How to Create a Stress-Free Investing Strategy

(Guest post by Joseph Hogue, CFA): The idea of stress-free investing for the individual investor is one of the best themes in The Intelligent Investor. Unfortunately, sometimes it’s a little vague on how you can apply the concepts and create your own portfolio. For that, I use one of my favorite investing tools to create a simple portfolio and save money investing.

What a Half Ironman Taught Me About Investing

This summer, I raced in a half-ironman competition. If you’re uninitiated to the world of triathlon, the half-ironman event involves a 1.2 mile open-water swim and a 56-mile bike ride, finished with a half-marathon (13.1 miles).

I invested time, energy, and money training for and competing in this event, both to test myself and earn bragging rights. This experience reinforced what I knew about investing, and offered new insights that surprised me.

Limit Order, Explained

When placing a buy or sell order for a stock or ETF, I’m typically prompted to indicate whether my order is a limit or market one. What’s the difference and why does it matter?

Page 1 of 3123